Special features of Breathe Suzuki Studio include:

  • thorough parent preparation
  • weekly group lessons
  • ample performance opportunities
  • study of folk songs and fiddle tunes

These features reflect the vision of Breathe Suzuki Studio:

  • Create a studio community that supports and celebrates everyone’s learning.
  • Be present for the process.
  • Embrace the traditions and skill sets of both classical music and folk music.

Create a studio community that supports and celebrates everyone’s learning.

Educate and empower parents

When several families are ready to begin lessons, we start everyone at the same time so that parents have a peer community, just as the students have.  Our first several weeks of lessons are just for the parent, so that he or she will have the specific skills to be a confident and competent home teacher when the child’s lessons start.

Once the child’s lessons start, we continue to meet quarterly for parent check-ins.

Hold weekly group lessons

Music is a team sport, so group lessons are just as important as individual lessons.  Not only is playing with others is one of the most rewarding parts of studying an instrument, but children learn as much or from their peers as they do from a teacher. Students and parents are able to build friendships when they see each other each week for group lessons.  For the teacher, group lessons are an efficient way to review and/or preview skills introduced in the individual lesson.

Provide ample performance opportunities

We hold at least two solo recitals each year.  We may also schedule informal community performances as opportunities arise. 

Connect with the larger Suzuki community

Students are encouraged to attend local workshops, play-ins, and summer institutes.

Just be present for the process.

Show up.  Breathe.

The most important thing we can do as learners, teachers, and/or parents is just to be present for the process.  Sometimes that means using the breath explicitly to help release tension in the body and center the awareness in the body and the present.  Whether breathwork gets us there or not, non-judgmental awareness can go a long way in helping us meet the inevitable emotional challenges of learning, parenting, and teaching—whether the challenge comes from ourselves, the instrument, or someone else—with compassion for everyone involved.

 

Embrace the traditions and skill sets of both classical music and folk music.

Use diverse repertoire

One of the coolest things about the violin is its versatility.   When students experience music from different genres and traditions, they are better able to enjoy what is special and fun about each tradition.

Continue to learn new best practices

In addition to my Suzuki teacher training, which prepares students for solo violin, orchestral, and chamber literature in the classical tradition, I am certified in the O’Connor method, which specializes in continuing ear training and developing creativity using American folk songs and fiddle tunes.

Related pages:

Studio Policy

Methods and Philosophy

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